Outtakes from NOLA
The carpetbagger's view of New Orleans
Outtakes from NOLA
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Krewe of Zulu parade, 12 Feb 2013 
Krewe of Zulu parade, 12 Feb 2013 
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duck w/ attitude
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Krewe of Tucks parade, 1 Mar 2014
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they live (Krewe of Muses parade, 27 Feb 2014)
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i’m touched 
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7 Dec 2013, St Charles
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lostcosmonaut:


“… Altercation and Freedia discuss with them how the dance pertains to first moments of sexual awakening.  They preach cultural reciprocation instead of cultural appropriation, how instead of just taking from this New Orleans bounce culture, you give something back to it.  And one of the ways you can give back to this culture is literally by dancing when Freedia tells you to.  No other American dance music besides bounce really has a human being front and center, except square dancing, so to dance when Freedia tells you to is to participate in this cultural conversation.”

           — Jay Pennington (DJ Rusty Lazer), OffBeat, 1 July 2011
lostcosmonaut:


“… Altercation and Freedia discuss with them how the dance pertains to first moments of sexual awakening.  They preach cultural reciprocation instead of cultural appropriation, how instead of just taking from this New Orleans bounce culture, you give something back to it.  And one of the ways you can give back to this culture is literally by dancing when Freedia tells you to.  No other American dance music besides bounce really has a human being front and center, except square dancing, so to dance when Freedia tells you to is to participate in this cultural conversation.”

           — Jay Pennington (DJ Rusty Lazer), OffBeat, 1 July 2011
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“ I am an entertainer. I love to make people have fun. And no matter where I am booked—it can be a party of 60 or 70-year-olds and I would go in and rock it and not short change them.” On Valentine’s night 2009, Freedia famously came from another show to take the stage at One Eyed Jacks for a ferocious performance to a gigantic crowd not three hours after learning her boyfriend had been shot and killed.

lostcosmonaut:


“It’s interesting to hear music about what other people go through, and I love the boys who rap about the guns and the money and the murders.  But it all has an influence on us.  A lot of time the beef starts with music.  They hear these lyrics like, ‘Beef ain’t never squashed ’til your enemy dead’ in the club, and they see their enemy and they’re having evil thoughts, so yeah, music has a big influence on the city. That’s why I try not to rap about nothing too negative …”

                — Big Freedia
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bottom picture is Krewe of King Arthur parade, 27 Jan 2013 
lostcosmonaut:

      A long time ago, when we hunted, and nobody wore spectacles, people who had poor eyesight would have been less valuable to a tribe’s economy, more susceptible to accidental death, and easier targets for predators.  As a result, most humans now living don’t have shitty eyesight.  My wife wears spectacles, and I wear spectacles because our ancestors got lucky and had other skills that compensated for seeing everything blurry; or lived with lenient tribes; or lived in environments where seeing everything blurry wasn’t a dealbreaker.  So goes the story.  Perhaps our eyesights aren’t shitty outside of the context of a literate society.  You ever wonder what your personality would be like if nobody knew how to read?  We’d like watching movies.  Nobody would’ve made any movies, though.  Nobody’d know to push record.  For a long time, nobody said shit.  First came grunts.  Then came grammar.  The rest is history.  Language existed before that, though, right?  It existed as a capacity.  Take the first sentence that was ever writ.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever spoke.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever thought.  Reverse-engineer that to what.  A feeling.  A need.  A logic.  A sequence of neural on-off switches.  A radiation.  Where was language before you used it to tell the others about the bear?  That’s right.  It was on ice.  It was on ice in the sun.  It travelled 8⅓ minutes as light and heat to get trapped in a leaf that got eaten by a deer that got hunted by you.  Then it was on ice in you, who got scared by the bear. You felt the fear that thawed the ice in which all sentences had been locked away.  “God damn it, guys,” you said, “that bear’s got knives for hands.”
http://lostcosmonaut.livejournal.com/2013/08/19/
bottom picture is Krewe of King Arthur parade, 27 Jan 2013 
lostcosmonaut:

      A long time ago, when we hunted, and nobody wore spectacles, people who had poor eyesight would have been less valuable to a tribe’s economy, more susceptible to accidental death, and easier targets for predators.  As a result, most humans now living don’t have shitty eyesight.  My wife wears spectacles, and I wear spectacles because our ancestors got lucky and had other skills that compensated for seeing everything blurry; or lived with lenient tribes; or lived in environments where seeing everything blurry wasn’t a dealbreaker.  So goes the story.  Perhaps our eyesights aren’t shitty outside of the context of a literate society.  You ever wonder what your personality would be like if nobody knew how to read?  We’d like watching movies.  Nobody would’ve made any movies, though.  Nobody’d know to push record.  For a long time, nobody said shit.  First came grunts.  Then came grammar.  The rest is history.  Language existed before that, though, right?  It existed as a capacity.  Take the first sentence that was ever writ.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever spoke.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever thought.  Reverse-engineer that to what.  A feeling.  A need.  A logic.  A sequence of neural on-off switches.  A radiation.  Where was language before you used it to tell the others about the bear?  That’s right.  It was on ice.  It was on ice in the sun.  It travelled 8⅓ minutes as light and heat to get trapped in a leaf that got eaten by a deer that got hunted by you.  Then it was on ice in you, who got scared by the bear. You felt the fear that thawed the ice in which all sentences had been locked away.  “God damn it, guys,” you said, “that bear’s got knives for hands.”
http://lostcosmonaut.livejournal.com/2013/08/19/
bottom picture is Krewe of King Arthur parade, 27 Jan 2013 
lostcosmonaut:

      A long time ago, when we hunted, and nobody wore spectacles, people who had poor eyesight would have been less valuable to a tribe’s economy, more susceptible to accidental death, and easier targets for predators.  As a result, most humans now living don’t have shitty eyesight.  My wife wears spectacles, and I wear spectacles because our ancestors got lucky and had other skills that compensated for seeing everything blurry; or lived with lenient tribes; or lived in environments where seeing everything blurry wasn’t a dealbreaker.  So goes the story.  Perhaps our eyesights aren’t shitty outside of the context of a literate society.  You ever wonder what your personality would be like if nobody knew how to read?  We’d like watching movies.  Nobody would’ve made any movies, though.  Nobody’d know to push record.  For a long time, nobody said shit.  First came grunts.  Then came grammar.  The rest is history.  Language existed before that, though, right?  It existed as a capacity.  Take the first sentence that was ever writ.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever spoke.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever thought.  Reverse-engineer that to what.  A feeling.  A need.  A logic.  A sequence of neural on-off switches.  A radiation.  Where was language before you used it to tell the others about the bear?  That’s right.  It was on ice.  It was on ice in the sun.  It travelled 8⅓ minutes as light and heat to get trapped in a leaf that got eaten by a deer that got hunted by you.  Then it was on ice in you, who got scared by the bear. You felt the fear that thawed the ice in which all sentences had been locked away.  “God damn it, guys,” you said, “that bear’s got knives for hands.”
http://lostcosmonaut.livejournal.com/2013/08/19/
bottom picture is Krewe of King Arthur parade, 27 Jan 2013 
lostcosmonaut:

      A long time ago, when we hunted, and nobody wore spectacles, people who had poor eyesight would have been less valuable to a tribe’s economy, more susceptible to accidental death, and easier targets for predators.  As a result, most humans now living don’t have shitty eyesight.  My wife wears spectacles, and I wear spectacles because our ancestors got lucky and had other skills that compensated for seeing everything blurry; or lived with lenient tribes; or lived in environments where seeing everything blurry wasn’t a dealbreaker.  So goes the story.  Perhaps our eyesights aren’t shitty outside of the context of a literate society.  You ever wonder what your personality would be like if nobody knew how to read?  We’d like watching movies.  Nobody would’ve made any movies, though.  Nobody’d know to push record.  For a long time, nobody said shit.  First came grunts.  Then came grammar.  The rest is history.  Language existed before that, though, right?  It existed as a capacity.  Take the first sentence that was ever writ.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever spoke.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever thought.  Reverse-engineer that to what.  A feeling.  A need.  A logic.  A sequence of neural on-off switches.  A radiation.  Where was language before you used it to tell the others about the bear?  That’s right.  It was on ice.  It was on ice in the sun.  It travelled 8⅓ minutes as light and heat to get trapped in a leaf that got eaten by a deer that got hunted by you.  Then it was on ice in you, who got scared by the bear. You felt the fear that thawed the ice in which all sentences had been locked away.  “God damn it, guys,” you said, “that bear’s got knives for hands.”
http://lostcosmonaut.livejournal.com/2013/08/19/
bottom picture is Krewe of King Arthur parade, 27 Jan 2013 
lostcosmonaut:

      A long time ago, when we hunted, and nobody wore spectacles, people who had poor eyesight would have been less valuable to a tribe’s economy, more susceptible to accidental death, and easier targets for predators.  As a result, most humans now living don’t have shitty eyesight.  My wife wears spectacles, and I wear spectacles because our ancestors got lucky and had other skills that compensated for seeing everything blurry; or lived with lenient tribes; or lived in environments where seeing everything blurry wasn’t a dealbreaker.  So goes the story.  Perhaps our eyesights aren’t shitty outside of the context of a literate society.  You ever wonder what your personality would be like if nobody knew how to read?  We’d like watching movies.  Nobody would’ve made any movies, though.  Nobody’d know to push record.  For a long time, nobody said shit.  First came grunts.  Then came grammar.  The rest is history.  Language existed before that, though, right?  It existed as a capacity.  Take the first sentence that was ever writ.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever spoke.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever thought.  Reverse-engineer that to what.  A feeling.  A need.  A logic.  A sequence of neural on-off switches.  A radiation.  Where was language before you used it to tell the others about the bear?  That’s right.  It was on ice.  It was on ice in the sun.  It travelled 8⅓ minutes as light and heat to get trapped in a leaf that got eaten by a deer that got hunted by you.  Then it was on ice in you, who got scared by the bear. You felt the fear that thawed the ice in which all sentences had been locked away.  “God damn it, guys,” you said, “that bear’s got knives for hands.”
http://lostcosmonaut.livejournal.com/2013/08/19/
bottom picture is Krewe of King Arthur parade, 27 Jan 2013 
lostcosmonaut:

      A long time ago, when we hunted, and nobody wore spectacles, people who had poor eyesight would have been less valuable to a tribe’s economy, more susceptible to accidental death, and easier targets for predators.  As a result, most humans now living don’t have shitty eyesight.  My wife wears spectacles, and I wear spectacles because our ancestors got lucky and had other skills that compensated for seeing everything blurry; or lived with lenient tribes; or lived in environments where seeing everything blurry wasn’t a dealbreaker.  So goes the story.  Perhaps our eyesights aren’t shitty outside of the context of a literate society.  You ever wonder what your personality would be like if nobody knew how to read?  We’d like watching movies.  Nobody would’ve made any movies, though.  Nobody’d know to push record.  For a long time, nobody said shit.  First came grunts.  Then came grammar.  The rest is history.  Language existed before that, though, right?  It existed as a capacity.  Take the first sentence that was ever writ.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever spoke.  Reverse-engineer that to the first sentence that was ever thought.  Reverse-engineer that to what.  A feeling.  A need.  A logic.  A sequence of neural on-off switches.  A radiation.  Where was language before you used it to tell the others about the bear?  That’s right.  It was on ice.  It was on ice in the sun.  It travelled 8⅓ minutes as light and heat to get trapped in a leaf that got eaten by a deer that got hunted by you.  Then it was on ice in you, who got scared by the bear. You felt the fear that thawed the ice in which all sentences had been locked away.  “God damn it, guys,” you said, “that bear’s got knives for hands.”
http://lostcosmonaut.livejournal.com/2013/08/19/
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Krewe of Zulu parade
lostcosmonaut:


The reception began much like the film, with Malick’s wife handling the discussion. But eventually she handed it over and I heard his voice for the first time. Nasally and sweetly reminiscent of Kermit the Frog, Malick’s quiet voice was obviously one of a man outside his comfort zone. People asked questions about the film, his life, his work and he took them all in stride. When my turn came, I asked if Malick was still planning to make a film of the classic Walker Percy novel, The Moviegoer. It is a book we both share a large amount of affection for and I had read that he had been considering it for many years. But this was December 2005. A few months earlier, New Orleans, the setting for the book, was destroyed by Katrina. “No” he said. “I don’t think the New Orleans of the book exists anymore.”

           — Jeff Martin, “Malick’s Return to Bartlesville”
PHOTOGRAPH:  St Charles Av, 12 Feb 2013